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SIP 2017 - Presentation & Statement

Ann Taylor – Cardiff University School of Medicine, United Kingdom

"There has been a groundswell of opinion that persistent pain needs to be reclassified and if we accept, for instance, that it is more than just a symptom, then the hilosophy of care should change from a biomedical model to that of a biopsychosocial one that views persistent pain as a disease or LTC."



Ann Taylor
Reader
Cardiff University School of Medicine

Ann is a Reader in Cardiff University working initially in education and establishing and running level 7 courses for multiprofessional groups. Her PhD work examined pain related fear and anxiety using fMRI finding that the brain in those with musculoskeletal chronic pain, compared to health controls processed pain words and pictures of activities of daily living through pain and fear centres despite having low kinesiophobia on a self report questionnaire. She was the lead author of the Chronic Pain Directives published in 2008 when Welsh Government endorsed pain as a long term condition and is now working on updating pain policy.

She is on the British Pain Society Council and chaired the primary care Map of Medicine pain pathway, was a member of a group developing a template on how pain can be introduced into an undergraduate curriculum and one reviewing terminology associated with routine recording of pain in clinical practice.

Ann has also been involved in raising pain awareness with the Faculty of Pain Medicine, Royal College of General Practitioners and Chronic Pain Policy Coalition. She is the project lead for ‘problematic/complex pain’, a pre-screening tool for early management of patients who are likely to develop chronicity which arose from the English Pain Summit. For the RCGP, was one of the lead authors on a publication supporting clinicians in the commissioning of pain services and the competency document for PwSI in Pain and the lead author of the pain commissioning support documents. For the Chronic Pain Policy Coalition, was a member of the public health task force - making pain a ‘high street’ condition and one of the authors of the English Pain Summit report.

Ann was on the Eular Fibromyalgia Guidelines update group and was an OMERACT fellow for the Pain Special Interest Group and attended the joint OMERACT IMMPACT meeting as a speaker and was the lead author or contributing author on a number of papers. One of the papers has significance to the SIP campaign, that is ‘Is Chronic Pain a Disease in Its Own Right? Discussions from a Pre-OMERACT 2014 Workshop on Chronic Pain’.

  1. Societal Impact of Pain (SIP)
  2. SIP 2017 - Presentation & Statement